Meet our Recent Advocates

Supporting the Global STEM Alliance

Martin Chalfie

Advocate

University Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Columbia University
New York, NY, USA

Honors  Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 2008
Member, National Academy of Science, National Academy of Medicine, American Association of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Martin Chalfie is a University Professor at Columbia University. He obtained his AB and PhD from Harvard University and did postdoctoral research with Sydney Brenner at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology before moving to Columbia in 1982. He uses the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate nerve cell development and function, concentrating primarily on genes used in mechanosensory neurons. His research has been directed toward answering two quite different biological questions: How do different types of nerve cells acquire and maintain their unique characteristics? and How do sensory cells respond to mechanical signals? He shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his introduction of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a biological marker.

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

Discoveries in science, engineering, and medicine give us a greater understanding of our world, enable new technologies and treatments that make us healthier and enrich our lives, and fuel economic growth. For these discoveries to continue in the future, we need to educate young people to become the next generation of scientists, engineers, and mathematicians. This education must be global to tap into the talent that is truly worldwide.

What are/were your goals for participation in the Global STEM Alliance?

I hope to help convey the excitement of science and scientific discovery to others.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

Promoting scientific inquiry worldwide and establishing connections to promote not only a shared educational goal, but also future scientific collaborations.

"Education must be global to tap into the talent that is truly worldwide."

Babur Habib

Advocate

Head of Engineering and Development, Intel Education
Intel Corporation
New York, NY, USA

Babur Habib is a passionate technologist who loves to geek out on all things tech. His first job out of college was at Intel Corporation, where he was part of the team that broke the 300Mhz barrier for the Pentium processors (yes, that was many, many moons ago). Since then he’s been involved in system-level design for digital TVs, set-top boxes, and digital cameras at Philips; quantum computing at Princeton University for his PhD; nuclear non-proliferation efforts with the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy at Princeton; and mining data to detect improvised explosive devices.

He co-founded Kno Inc. in 2009 with the vision to change how students learn with the help of digital technology. Kno Inc. was acquired by Intel Corporation in 2013, and now he heads up the engineering and development group for Intel Education. He loves playing squash and binge-watching House of Cards.

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

I have realized the importance of STEM training over my career as a technologist. With 75% of jobs in the future requiring some level of STEM training, we can’t afford to remain passive about this area. We need to make sure that technical training remains relevant to the 21st century and to the needs of the tech firms that will be employing future technologists. GSA is taking the right steps to make this transformation happen at the national level, working with governments as well as at the individual student/teacher levels.

What are/were your goals for participation in the Global STEM Alliance?

My goal is to help in the implementation of technology solutions that the New York Academy of Sciences is undertaking to make STEM training more effective. Intel Education firmly believes in building the right technology products that augment and facilitate the act of learning and assist educators in their efforts to teach. GSA is doing just that for global STEM education, and hence it’s a natural collaboration between the two teams.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

GSA is raising the acute problem of tackling STEM training in the 21st century at the global level. The most important aspect of this alliance is the aim to build a thriving STEM culture that infuses the entire population with an understanding of the importance and opportunity that lies within STEM. 


"The most important aspect of this alliance is the aim to build a thriving STEM culture that infuses the entire population with an understanding of the importance and opportunity that lies within STEM."

Paul Walker

Advocate

Global Co-Head, Technology Division
Goldman Sachs
New York, NY, USA

Paul Walker is the global co-head of Goldman Sachs' Technology Division, which employs more than 8,000 engineers around the world. Prior to his current role, he led various aspects of technology, risk management, and strategy in the firm's Securities Division. He is also vice-chair of the Board of Governors of the New York Academy of Sciences. Walker holds a PhD and an MSc in Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne and a BA in Physics from Cornell University.

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

A scientifically literate population is critical for all the global challenges we face this century, whether they are in technology, fundamental research, or medicine. Creating the next generation of great scientists is the surest way to enable the great advances we saw in the 20th century to continue.

What are/were your goals for participation in the Global STEM Alliance?

My goals for participating in the Alliance are to help the entire Global STEM network, and especially the experts in the New York Academy of Sciences K-12 program, scale their program and activities to better target eager science learners around the world.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

The GSA provides connectivity and commonality of experience amongst a globally diverse group of learners, some of whom are being exposed to science for the first time, and some of whom will be the great scientists of the future. Bringing these individuals together around great content, great people, and great experiences in a platform  provides opportunities for  governments, corporations, scientists, and philanthropists that will lead to tangible opportunities and results in science education.

"A scientifically literate population is critical for all the global challenges we face this century."