Meet some of our Mentors & Educators

Changing young lives through STEM

Alexandra Bausch

Mentor

Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Columbia University
Palisades, NY, USA

Affiliated with  Afterschool STEM Mentoring Program

Honors  NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship (2013-2015), Norwegian Marshall Fund Scholarship (2010), Fulbright Student Fellowship, Norway (2009-2010), G. N. Quam Award for Academic Excellence in Chemistry, Highest Honor in Chemistry at Villanova University (2009), Gregor Mendel Award for Academic Excellence in Science, Highest Honor in the Sciences at Villanova University (2009), Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship (2008), Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society, Sigma of Pennsylvania Chapter (Inducted 2008)

Degrees  M.S. Environmental Engineering, University of Stavanger (Stavanger, Norway) (2009-2011); B.S. Chemistry, Biochemistry Concentration, Summa Cum Laude, Villanova University (2005-2009)

Ali grew up in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Chemistry with a concentration in Biochemistry from Villanova University. As an undergraduate student, she conducted laboratory research in Analytical Chemistry, performed field research at the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium in Alaska, and participated in and led numerous community service projects. Following graduation, she was awarded a Fulbright Student Fellowship in Environmental Chemistry at the University of Stavanger in Norway. While there, she earned a Norwegian Marshall Fund Scholarship and went on to complete her master’s degree in Environmental Engineering with a focus in Water Science and Technology. Before she began her Ph.D., she conducted research at both NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York. Ali is currently a third-year Ph.D. student in the department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University, conducting research at the interface of Biological and Chemical Oceanography. Her graduate research project, funded by a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, addresses the impacts of climate change on the base of the marine food web in the Arabian Sea ecosystem.

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

STEM education initiatives help shape the next generation of scientists. The Global STEM Alliance not only engages students in the excitement of hands-on (read: messy and fun) science experiments, it motivates and encourages girls and boys from diverse backgrounds to pursue lifelong involvement in STEM. This involvement is vital to the STEM community because diversity enriches science and helps deepen our understanding of the world.

What are/were your goals for participation in the Global STEM Alliance?

I would like to devote my life to research and to the education of future generations of scientists. Throughout my participation in the Global STEM Alliance, I hope to spread my passion for science, to teach young girls and boys to love science as much as I do. I hope that this valuable mentoring and teaching opportunity will help make me a better instructor. And I hope to encourage students in my local community to grow up to make our planet a little bit better.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

The most important benefit of the Global STEM Alliance is the encouragement and support it provides to budding science enthusiasts. This initiative encourages kids from diverse backgrounds to become involved in science and promotes diversity in STEM fields in an effort to impact positive change in the world.

 

"STEM education initiatives help shape the next generation of scientists."

Giovanna Collu

Mentor

Postdoctoral Fellow
Developmental and Regenerative Biology
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York, NY, USA

Affiliated with NeXXt Scholars Program, Afterschool STEM Mentoring Program

Honors  Recipient of Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council PhD studentship, Medical Research Council Masters Studentship, and King’s College bursaries for undergraduate research

Degrees  PhD and MRes in Developmental Biology, University of Manchester, UK; MA and BA (Hons.) in Natural Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK

Dr. Giovanna Collu is a researcher, communicator, and mentor with a drive to encourage the next generation of scientists to overcome challenges they face in STEM fields. For the last 12 years, Giovanna has been investigating how cells communicate with each other to produce fully formed adult organisms.

Throughout her career, Giovanna has engaged with several outreach groups to promote equitable access to the benefits of STEM education. At the University of Manchester, she worked with the Manchester Access Programme to support underrepresented minority students transitioning to college, and with a Wellcome Trust-funded initiative to bring local underserved students into a university research environment to discover science first hand and participate in fun, science-based activities. Giovanna also taught on the Manchester Leadership Programme, a course that framed leadership issues in a social and ethical context for the next generation of leaders.

Here in the US, she has worked with the New York Academy of Sciences to engage middle-school pupils with forensic science in an afterschool program in Harlem, in association with Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's DNA Learning Center. Giovanna continues to promote women in STEM through mentoring summer students and has participated in the NeXXt Scholars Program since 2013.

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

Initiatives such as the Afterschool Mentoring and NeXXt Scholars Programs promote equity in STEM education, which in turn creates much-needed diversity in STEM professions. These programs are an opportunity not only to reach individual young scientists but also to make a positive impact in making society more equitable as a whole. The Academy's STEM education programs are a vital tool if we are to level the playing field for underserved communities. It is an honor to support young people from backgrounds that are currently underrepresented in STEM fields to pursue their passion and curiosity.
 
What are/were your goals for participation in the Global STEM Alliance?

My goals were to inspire individual students and to gain an understanding of the challenges faced by this generation of STEM students. Having benefited from mentoring schemes myself, I am keen to join the community of researchers encouraging younger generations to follow their curiosity and enter STEM fields.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

The Alliance gives young people from diverse backgrounds the access to mentoring that they would not otherwise have. Mentoring and exposure to positive role models are vital for realizing potential and raising aspirations in young people. By connecting young people with successful STEM professionals, the Global STEM Alliance provides a network of support for students who might otherwise feel isolated or disconnected from their discipline. The Alliance guides young people as they are finding their own path into STEM fields and reveals a whole realm of career possibilities.

"By connecting young people with successful STEM professionals, the Global STEM Alliance provides a network of support for students who might otherwise feel isolated or disconnected from their discipline."

Carla Emanuele

Program Manager

Hometown: Jersey City, NJ

Title: Program Manager, Education 

An average Monday on the job:

My first priority is to make sure our program participants [for 1000 Girls, 1000 Futures, the program I manage] are enjoying what they’re doing and that everything is running smoothly, so I’ll spend a good amount of time going through emails and the Learning Hub to check in. Then I’ll go over our events calendar to see what behind-the-scenes things I need to do to make sure we have those engagement opportunities ready to go. Since we are a very forward-thinking organization, there is usually something on deck involving the next year of programming, or a new project we’re doing, so I’ll add to-do items to my weekly list based on that. At some point, I find time to grab lunch, too! 

What were you doing before you joined the GSA team?

I was working with the Children’s Museum of Manhattan. 

If you could join a GSA program now, which would you join and why?

I would definitely join 1000 Girls, 1000 Futures—not to be biased or anything! I think female-driven programs are important and I think it’s really cool to see how accomplished the mentors and mentees are! 

Which upcoming GSA activity are you most excited about?

The Summit is going to be a really fantastic event. It’s going to be this fun, educational gathering of all of these brilliant people we’ve been working with online for almost a year. Meeting face to face with so many is going to be amazing! 

As a kid, what did you want to be? 

A whole mess of things, but I always wanted something to do in education. 

Why is science is more important now than ever? 

The world is changing rapidly and we need to keep up.  

Anything else?

One of my favorite shows on TV right now is “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and I mostly love it because it features some pretty great female superheroes. If you haven’t watched it yet, you really, really should.

Ron Fritz

Mentor

Sr. Principal Engineer, Statistician
PepsiCo
Global Resource - Barrington, IL

Affiliated with The Junior Academy

What are your students working on?

Food Loss and Waste: Transportation and Logistics. Specifically, they came up with an ingenious use of evaporative cooling; designing, building, and testing a non-electric 'fridge' (based on 'zeer pot' technology) made of recycled materials.

What surprised you about your students?

I knew they would be smart and clever, but what surprised me was their incredible focus and tenacity in going after solutions to design problems encountered. They didn't back off or quit when a challenge emerged but rather relished the opportunity to overcome it.

What surprised you about your mentoring experience?

The student's 'relentless' engagement made it great fun for me (and I think for the team as a whole.) There's nothing better than being part of a team working like failure is not an option. It was exhilarating because of the awesome work ethic the students employed and the leadership that evolved among them. To be honest, just prior to the kick off of the challenge I was considering dropping out due to increased business demands on my schedule. I am so glad I didn't. Even though those demands did not diminish, these kids’ efforts were inspiring and kept me going.

What kind of growth did you see in your students? 

With some of the students it was leadership, in others "followership" – with all it was 'hey, we've got a great team, great ideas and great talents that can make a difference!' That attitude energized everyone, including myself.  Perhaps the correct word is 'devoted' to finishing the team's mission. I think the type of camaraderie experienced was a first for some of the students. Also, the level of talent brought together. As a youth sports coach over the years, this was like realizing you have something really special going on with a particular collection of kids.

Anything else you'd like to share?

Yes.  I think the key thing here is that these kids are in a class by themselves. World class. Not just smart, but motivated, eager, and most important invested. This makes mentoring in this venue a unique experience, truly providing an opportunity to accomplish something of significance with 'no holds barred', ‘blue sky' thinkers.

There's nothing better than being part of a team working like failure is not an option.

Marissa Gray

Mentor

Teaching Professor and the Associate Director of Graduate Programs for the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry, and Biological Sciences
Stevens Institute of Technology
Hoboken, NJ, USA

Affiliated with  1000 Girls, 1000 Futures

Who has been your biggest science inspiration?

Honestly, I’m inspired by normal scientists and engineers--people who spend the majority of their lives working in the science and engineering industry and love it. I enjoy talking to other scientists and engineers about their work because they are always so excited about what they're working on and because it's usually very cool.

What’s a fun fact about you that might surprise your friends or colleagues?

When I was young I wanted to be an archeologist or a weather(wo)man (meteorologist). I guess science was always on my brain! My personal definition of science is discovering new ideas either through experiments, trial and error, or just by chance. I think science is all about discovering how things work.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

Collaboration and the exchange of ideas. I think the Global STEM Alliance, first and foremost, encourages people to get excited about science! The Alliance also urges scientists and engineers to share their ideas with one another, which ultimately leads to collaboration and further development in science and technology. 

"My personal definition of science is discovering new ideas either through experiments, trial and error, or just by chance."

Andrew Koemeter-Cox

Mentor

Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Neuroscience
Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
New York, NY

Affiliated with  Afterschool STEM Mentoring Program

Degrees  PhD, Biomedical Sciences, The Ohio State University; B.S., Biochemistry, University of Delaware

A native of Philadelphia, Andrew recently moved to New York City with his fiancée. He received his doctorate in Biomedical Sciences from The Ohio State University in August of 2014 and started his first Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine shortly thereafter. In the laboratory of Hongyan Zou, he is currently investigating the epigenetic control mechanisms of the axon regeneration program in peripheral neurons.

Having taught at the undergraduate and graduate level, Andrew decided to participate in the New York Academy of Sciences Afterschool STEM Mentoring program as a way to give back to his new city. Working with the YMCA Talented and Gifted program, he has been able to teach and share his love of science with eager students. When not in the lab or the classroom, Andrew enjoys watching and playing sports and sampling the fine cuisine that New York City has to offer. 

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

Unfortunately, science in the news and popular cutlure is presented as an exotic subject that is too dense to understand or appreciate without an advanced degree or a massive amount of intelligence. I would like to impart an appreciation and understanding of basic scientific concepts on students during their formative years, when it can have a lasting impact. I also want to show students that scientists are normal people, not like the bizarre characters you normally see in popular media. Finally, I want to strengthen my ability to communicate scientific concepts to different audiences. I am interested in eventually entering into a career in science policy or advocacy, and successful communication about science is critical to either of these careers.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides? 

I believe a good STEM education can lead to an improved quality of life. The ability to critically evaluate information and synthesize new concepts is a valuable skill, even outside of the STEM fields. An understanding of basic scientific concepts is crucial to helping our global community deal with climate change, clean energy, and other challenges ahead. Increasing the visibility and accessibility of STEM education is vital to improving the lives of people today, tomorrow, and in the future.

"I want to show students that scientists are normal people, not like the bizarre characters you normally see in popular media."

Oscar A. Lemus

Educator

Robotics Instructor
Good Shepherd Services
Bronx, NY, USA

Affiliated with   Afterschool STEM Mentoring Program

Career fields  Multimedia Computer Science

A strategic, multidisciplinary designer and art director with an eye for innovation and pixel perfection, Oscar Lemus has been working with Good Shepherd Services Beacon 45 for five years. Teaching art, technology and in the course, creating and coaching award-winning teams such as the Bronx Task Force and the elementary robotics team Beacon Mindeez. Oscar also created and coached the award-winning team 300 Robo-Spartans and the junior team Little Genius, who represent The School of Science and Applied Learning, all the while introducing STEM to participants and inspiring a cycle of competency in belonging, generosity, independence, and mastery for both middle- and elementary-level scholars. Although his skill level is vast, his greatest expertise revolves in the worlds of interactive computer program design and information architecture. His wish is to combine his knowledge and experience in these areas, to deliver the best creative, innovative, and interactive experience a Beacon participant will always remember. His favorite quote is "You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him find it within himself" (Galileo Galilei).

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

Since I was young, I have been fascinated by technology - by the NASA space shuttle and the computer science that helped launch the space vehicle into orbit. My first significant STEM experience happened when Astronaut Lt. Commander Mario Runco visited my grammar school and demonstrated the physics of toys in space. That day, I was given the opportunity to interact with a real American hero and scientist and wear a space suit. For a brief moment I felt powerful and ready to take on any challenge. Lt. Runco demonstrated the power of NASA technology while discussing the importance of learning math and science. My appreciation for STEM has helped me better understand the world around me and eventually led me to work in the technology field.

I strongly believe every child should have the opportunity to meet a STEM hero. I believe it is crucial to address the U.S. STEM crisis and how it directly affects underrepresented people in our communities. Our partnership with the Global STEM Alliance is very important as it provides quality exposure to STEM and, most importantly, connects young, passionate scientists with students in our communities who are eager to learn.

What are/were your goals for participation in the Global STEM Alliance?

As an afterschool STEM educator, my first goal is to equip a high volume of afterschool participants with life skills through robotics. Leadership, critical thinking, communication, and collaboration are all needed skills to be successful in the 21st century. My second goal is to convey the value of education by strengthening the linkage with the school day curriculum. My third goal is to raise awareness of the importance of STEM to our communities, parents, leaders, administrators, and local businesses.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

The most important benefit I feel the Global STEM Alliance provides is the opportunity to work alongside and be mentored by scientists, engineers, and doctors. Through partnership with the Global STEM Alliance, students engage in interactive, academic-enriching experiences where they work with professionals from different STEM careers and countries. As a result, students become more culturally aware and are more exposed to novel career opportunities.

"Our partnership with the Global STEM Alliance provides quality exposure to STEM and connects young, passionate scientists with students in our communities who are eager to learn."

Elise Ogden

Product Manager

Hometown: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Job Title: Product Manager

Describe an average Monday for you on the job.

Come into the office, appreciate the awesome views we have up here, and (during these summer months) continue recruiting awesome mentors for the Junior Academy!  If it’s a good Monday, I get to read some nice emails from mentors about how much they loved working with their teams for the challenges. 

What you were doing before you joined the GSA team?

Running programs at a variety of small education nonprofits in both Minneapolis and NYC. Also taking classes part time to get my MBA.

If you could join a GSA program now, which would you join and why?

Well, I’m biased, but I’d choose the Junior Academy because I love the global collaboration and I really enjoy project-based learning. The fact that these students and mentors are working to solve real-world problems (and that some of their solutions seem like they could make a difference!), is super inspiring. 

Which upcoming GSA activity are you most excited about?

The Summit! I can’t wait to actually meet some of our students and mentors in person after working with them virtually for so long. 

As a kid, I wanted to be a(n):

Author, then Pipi Longstocking, then an actor, then the president, then a photographer.

Science is more important now than ever because:

The problems facing our planet (and our very human existence) are greater than ever.

Anything else?

I love rock climbing (when I’m not injured), I used to captain a rugby team, and I’m looking for some good fantasy book recommendations if anyone has them (Robert Jordan is my favorite, George RR Martin is decent).

Oscar Pineda-Catalan

Mentor and Educator

Visiting Scientist
Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics
American Museum of Natural History
New York, NY, USA

Affiliated with  Nobelist Mindset Program

Honors  Fulbright and Kluge Fellow

Degrees  PhD, Ecology and Evolution, Columbia University
MA, Conservation Biology, Columbia University
MA, Urban Studies, El Colegio de México
BA, Biomedical Sciences, National Autonomous University of Mexico

Dr. Pineda-Catalan is a conservation biologist who has developed research and education programs to motivate and engage youth to pursue careers in science. He has managed programs that have opened opportunities for hundreds of New York City high school students to participate in structured research projects mentored by professional scientists: The Urban Barcode Project at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's DNA Learning Center and the Science Research Mentoring Program at the American Museum of Natural History. He has also collaborated with the New York Academy of Sciences in the Nobelist Mindset Program, a Malaysian Initiative to develop soft skills of young people to participate in science, and with the Wildlife Conservation Society, training young professionals that work in conservation biology projects.

Dr. Pineda-Catalan obtained a Master's degree in Conservation Biology and a PhD in Ecology and Evolution at Columbia University. He pursued a Masters in Urban Studies at El Colegio de México and did his undergraduate studies in Biomedical Research at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. He is an expert in conservation biology who has conducted studies in genetics and the wildlife health of endangered species. He presently lives in Chicago, IL, working as an international consultant in science initiatives.

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

STEM fields are facing a crisis period at the global scale. The number of talented people participating nowadays in science is declining. Through the Global STEM Alliance I can contribute to attracting and engaging talented youth to pursue careers in science, as well as motivate them to incorporate STEM perspectives in their professional activities.

What are/were your goals for participation in the Global STEM Alliance?

I can contribute in three aspects in the Global STEM Alliance. First, I can mentor and train students who are interested in participating in science projects. Second, I can also train young scientists on how to mentor and work with teenagers. Finally, I can participate in developing workshops, courses, and other activities for this initiative.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

One of the most important aspects to motivating and engaging youth to participate in science is to provide them with adequate guidance and access to resources. Fortunately, technology can facilitate communication and reduce barriers for people to participate in STEM activities. The Global STEM Alliance can thus link interested youth with professional scientists who can mentor and provide support to them. Also this initiative can promote the development of global networks among all participants and potentiate their work.

"One of the most important aspects to motivating and engaging youth to participate in science is to provide them with adequate guidance and access to resources."

Jonathan Isaac Schneiderman

Mentor

Associate Director of Science
McCANN RCW
New York, NY, USA

Affiliated with  Afterschool STEM Mentoring Program

Degrees  PhD, Genetics, Harvard University
BSc, Life Science, Tel-Aviv University

Dr. Jonathan Schneiderman was born in Texas, spent most of his life in Israel, and returned to the US to pursue a PhD in Genetics. Jonathan has worked at the lab bench for 12 years both as a graduate student and as a postdoctoral research fellow, conducting experiments on gene expression and repression in eukaryotes. In addition to research, he has been involved in teaching numerous courses and has mentored many students within the lab setting.

Jonathan has also been heavily engaged in community outreach and has served both as an afterschool STEM Education Fellow with the New York Academy of Sciences and as a mentor with the Science Outreach Lab at Rockefeller University. He is currently working at a leading pharmaceutical advertising agency. His roles include internal education on drugs and disease states, as well as providing clients with science-driven strategic recommendations.

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

STEM education is an important equalizer. It bridges two main societal gaps. The first is the one that stems from a lack of early exposure to science in certain populations. This inequality snowballs and greatly diminishes the likelihood of disadvantaged kids to pursue higher education later in life.

The second gap is the one between science and the public. Research is primarily funded by tax payers, yet is conducted behind closed doors and a wall of technical jargon. STEM education delivers science to a wider audience. It does this not only by making science more accessible, but also by highlighting its significance and application. Bringing STEM into the classroom helps shape inquisitive minds, and that, in my opinion, fuels the creation of healthier communities.

What are/were your goals for participation in the Global STEM Alliance?

My goal in being a STEM mentor was not to relay specific scientific content, but rather to make genuine connections. The main problem is that although we see, hear, taste, smell, and feel science all the time, for most of us its very concept is extremely alienating. My goal therefore was to put a friendly face on science; to have kids realize that it is a part of everything they do, and as such is something with which they are already very familiar.

What is the most important benefit you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

The fear of failure keeps many kids from investing in things that they believe they may not be good at. Seeding a positive relationship with science at an early age builds confidence; it tells kids that they are smart enough, empowers them to ask questions, and to critically assess the answers that they get in response. The benefit of awakening curiosity and independent thinking in kids extends much further than just learning about STEM. Confidence is long-lasting, and it will fuel their ambition in whichever path they choose.

"STEM education is an important equalizer."

Ankit Shah

Mentor

Graduate Engineer at ARM
Bangalore, India

Affiliated with The Junior Academy

What are your students working on?

Our team Aquavitae worked on developing a water filtration system to provide underserved people with access to clean water. Students have created a prototype that cleans biological and chemical contaminants and is a portable solution to one's water needs.

What surprised you about your students?

My students were industrious and had a plethora of ideas which kind of excited me as well as surprised me, partly because the ideas generated during our brainstorming sessions were great and needed further channeling to turn into a viable product.

What surprised you about your mentoring experience?

The mentoring experience was great. Despite not having necessary technical background/experience with water filtration systems, I was surprised to find out the challenges in this field and scope of improvement possibilities that lie within this area of interest.

What kind of growth did you see in your students?

Students were more collaborative in the later stages of the challenge and took responsibilities well. They were well organised in terms of the task allocations and implementation. Their ideas were well structured and they had enough reason to back up their ideas.

What kind of growth did you experience yourself?

Over the course of challenge, my managerial skills improved drastically. Apart from gaining expertise in unexplored domains, I was able to catch up with research work done by each member of the team and provided feedback on key improvements to their ideas.

Ability to adjust to a global setting with team collaboration from Europe, US, and India was a challenge, however it was easy going in the latter half of the competition.

Anything else you'd like to share?

Thank you to the Global STEM Alliance for conducting this challenge. It was a great experience working with young bright minds and creating solutions addressing global needs.

My students were industrious and had a plethora of ideas which kind of excited me as well as surprised me.

Na Xu

Mentor

Assistant Professor
Natural Sciences
LaGuardia Community College
Long Island City, New York

Honors  IRACDA-BETTR Scholar (Institutional Research and Academic Career Development Awards, NIH & Albert Einstein School of Medicine), Harry Eagle Scholar (Albert Einstein School of Medicine)

Degrees  Ph.D. (Weill Medical School of Cornell University)

Na Xu earned her Ph.D. in Cell and Developmental biology from Weill Medical College of Cornell University. As a graduate student, she characterized the novel role of Rho GTPase in Drosophila embryonic salivary gland invagination, migration and lumen size control. She has presented her work at national and international conferences, and has published in many scientific journals and book chapters. She also mentored and published with high school students, who won many scientific awards due to her mentorship. During her postdoctoral fellowship at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Dr. Xu worked with Dr. Arthur Skoultchi and Dr. Dmitry Fyodorov to determine how linker histone H1 regulates blood tumor formation in Drosophila. Besides of scientific research, Dr. Xu continued promoting science education in inner city schools. She served as a mentor of the afterschool STEM mentoring program at the New York Academy of Science. She also won an award (IRACDA-BETTR Scholar) from National Institute of Health to be a science educator. As IRACDA-BETTR scholar, she taught at Hostos Community College (CUNY) while doing her postdoctoral research. Currently, Dr. Xu is working at LaGuardia Community College (CUNY) as Assistant Professor. She is a mentor for CUNY Scholars to promote undergraduate scientific research.

Why and how are STEM education and the Global STEM Alliance important to you?

I have always been passionate about STEM education. Mentoring students and helping them grow as a scientist is the most rewarding experience to me. Having more scientists is extremely important for our country and society. Our society in the future will need more experts in STEM discipline. Therefore, it is extremely important for the younger generation to love science and to enroll in STEM disciplines. Global STEM Alliance is very meaningful. I believe this effort will have far-reaching implications in the future.

What are/were your goals for participation in the Global STEM Alliance?

My goal is help more kids and students to have fun with science, to be involved in scientific activities and to grow as a scientist.

What is the most important benefit that you feel the Global STEM Alliance provides?

I think Global STEM Alliance not only provides great learning opportunity for kids around the world, but also provides an opportunity for scientists like myself to contribute to the society, to be connected with a bigger audience and to grow as an educator.

"Mentoring students and helping them grow as a scientist is the most rewarding experience to me."